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Heights OBGYN

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Old Wives’ Tales About Pregnancy

Old wive's tales. Learn the truth from our Heights OBGYNs.

You’re pregnant, and that makes you a convenient target for lots of unwanted advice. Everyone knows old wives’ tales about pregnancy, and many people are happy to share them with you. Some are fun, but some are dangerous, so if you have any questions about pregnancy myths, ask our knowledgeable Heights OBGYNs before you follow anyone else’s advice.

Old wives’ tales about pregnancy and food

Many of the old tales revolve around finding out your baby’s gender, but ultrasounds have, for the most part, taken the place of this folklore. The next most common advice involves food.

Here are some of the false tales you may hear.

• If you eat certain foods, such as dairy or peanut butter, you will cause your baby to have allergies to those foods. The foods you eat while pregnant do not cause allergies in your baby; in fact, it’s better for your baby if you eat a healthy, varied diet.

• Eating spicy foods makes your baby’s eyes burn, or could even cause blindness. This is probably one of the older tales, but there’s nothing to fear. The only thing that happens if you eat spicy foods is that you may develop heartburn, but remember that heartburn does not mean your baby will be born with lots of hair.

• Cravings mean that your baby needs or wants the food you crave. If you crave ice cream, do you need calcium? If you crave pickles, does your baby love the taste? Nope! Your baby doesn’t influence your cravings — it’s all you.

Two pregnancy myths our obstetricians want you to ignore

Here are two harmful pregnancy myths that you should discuss with your physician. Pregnancy diet and exercise are based on your individual needs.

• You are eating for two now, so be certain to eat twice as much as you did before you got pregnant. You probably only need about 340 extra calories daily starting in the second trimester, and about 450 more during the third trimester. You should add healthy foods to your diet, along with prenatal vitamins. Talk to your physician about your nutritional needs if you are expecting multiples.

• You can’t exercise when you are pregnant. Here’s another pregnancy myth that’s an oldie but not a goodie. If you are having a normal pregnancy, and your doctor says you are healthy, you can participate in moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. Ask our San Antonio OBGYNs for exercise dos and don’ts.

Our San Antonio OBGYNs have the real scoop about pregnancy

Old wives’ tales about pregnancy can be fun, but they can also be harmful. Remember, your physicians are the ultimate source of medical and pregnancy information. Contact Heights Obstetrics and Gynecology for an appointment.